Subversion Launches

On September 13, 2016, after years of revising and editing, I launched Subversion, sequel to Enslavement and book two in the One Bright Future series. I am so pleased to finally get to share this YA dystopian novel with readers. Honestly, I like it better than the first book, but we’ll see what you all think.

Buy it on Amazon. If you want an electronic version, it’s coming soon.

Greetings from the World’s Worst Blogger and Free Writing Results

Greetings. It’s been awhile. Okay, maybe I’m not the worst blogger, but I win for inconsistency. I have a good excuse though. I’ve been hard at work on edits for Subversion, the sequel to Enslavement. I’m not sure what my excuse was when I wasn’t working through edit, but I’m certain I can come up with something. There are so many good excuses not to blog.:)

At my writers’ group, we often do free writing exercises. We’re given a starter topic and five minutes to work our writerly magic. It’s amazing where the brain goes . . . and sometimes a little frightening. Here’s a free write I did a couple weeks ago.

The topic: write a query hook for a novel about a moody teenager.grimace-1012862_1920

Talia Mooney rolled her eyes one too many times. Her optic nerves and tendons stretched and flexed, slingshotting. Her eyes rolled over and over. There’s only one way to stop the rolling and that’s to clean her room. But she’s only got 24 hours to do it before her eyes roll permanently, never stopping. Can she clean her room before her eyes get stuck in perpetual motion and she becomes the eternally moody teenager?

Oh, the raw mush that comes out of writers’ brains. Delicious!



Weird Stuff People Say at Book Signings

booksigingA couple weeks ago at a book signing, an older gentleman took a look at Enslavement and proceeded to tell me how he didn’t read science fiction by female authors. It was tempting to get offended, but I took the comment in stride. I engaged him on why he felt that way and wished him all the best. It wasn’t the first odd comment I’d received. People have said some weird stuff to me at book signings.

At the same signing, after giving a brief synopsis of my book, a woman told me that the government truly was watching us all. She came back later in the day to remind me, “They’re watching us.”

book signingLast fall, a man seemed particularly interested in my book. He asked what it was about, and I gave him my quick pitch. “It takes place in the future. It’s about a seventeen-year-old girl who is sold into slavery because of her family’s beliefs.” He informed me that the title indicated it could be about S&M bondage. I told him it was definitely not about that, that he may have my book confused with another book. He insisted that it was about bondage. “But, it’s not. I wrote it. I know.” He ended up buying the book, because he was sure I was wrong.

I can’t tell you how many people, after giving my pitch–“It takes place in the future…”–have asked me if it’s a true story. I resist the urge to say, “Yes, absolutely true. I can see into the future and this is going to happen. For $20 I’ll give you lottery numbers.”

My absolute favourite, though, is, “Are you famous?” If you have to ask, I’m probably not.

I maintain my belief–people are weird. But are they ever entertaining!

Do you have a book signing story? Have people said anything memorable to you? Please share in the comments.



Why This Writer Supports Independent Film

film fest1Because of my involvement in the Winnipeg Real to Reel Film Festival, I’ve been asked on several occasions if I’m involved in film making in some way. The answer is “no”. I’m simply involved because I want to support independent artists. As a writer, I was familiar with the writing and publishing industry, but I was curious about the film industry and thought the best way to learn more was to talk to people involved.

This year I had the privilege of seeing some great independent films, chauffeuring Toronto filmmaker, Zahra Faraji, around Winnipeg and leading talkback sessions for four films. Each time I introduced myself to theater patrons, I opened with the following, which I think encapsulates why I continue to volunteer at the festival:

“My name is Melinda Friesen. I’m an author, and I also work for a local publishing company. I believe strongly in supporting independent artists because not every great book is found on a bestsellers table, not every engaging piece of music makes it to the Grammy stage, and not every worthwhile film lands at the Cineplex. It’s festivals like this one that open our eyes and our ears to new perspectives and new voices.”

I encourage everyone to find ways to support and champion local and independent artists. Not only will you encounter some new and amazing material, but you might even get the opportunity to interact with creatives. You may be surprised what you discover.

film fest4

Filmmaker panel.

Author Meets Podcast

I was super excited when a local book club made contact and informed me they’d chosen Enslavement as their November read. They invited me in when they met together to discuss the book. One of the club members also had a podcast called Literally, Katrina. She informed me that she intended to record the meeting for the podcast. Honestly, I really hate the sound of my own voice, but never one to let a good opportunity slip away, I enthusiastically agreed to join them. After I forgot about the microphone, I had a great time listening their impressions of my book.

Take a listen: click here.

Thanks to the whole Literally A Book Club crew! It was great meeting all of you.


Back at the end of October, a fellow writer at Comic Con asked me for an interview for his podcast, Just Joshing. It’s short interview, but hey, I’ve never been verbally wordy. I also get to share the podcast with fellow writer and friend, Christine Steendam. You’ll hear her at the beginning, and I’ll show up toward the end.

Head over to Just Joshing to read a short interview, then get more info in the recording: click here.

Thanks Josh for the opportunity!


A Peek into My “Completed” Files

Sometimes I get overwhelmed by my “to-do” list. Other times I get overwhelmed by my “completed” list. Why? Finishing a story is only the beginning. Here’s a list of my “completed” projects and where they are in the process of getting them from my computer to readers.


Captivity (One Bright Future book 2): I’m deep into editing on this one and aiming for a spring release.

Book three and four in the One Bright Future series: Tangled messes. My publisher has asked me to complete the series in three books, so many plot lines and and characters are up in the air as I attempt to condense and finish the series much faster than I thought I’d have to.

Solar: This YA sci-fi/twisted romance has receiving over 80 rejections. I’ve stopped querying this one, acquired some new beta readers, wrote a new beginning and am reworking the solar-flare-601043_1280manuscript. In the spring, I hope to have it ready to start sending out again.

Solar Book Two: The sequel to Solar is hibernating until I find a publisher for Solar.

Solar Book Three: Work-in-Progress. I’m 60 pages into the final installment in the Solar series.

The Miller’s Daughter: This new adult paranormal romance is currently being queried. Several editors and agents are currently reviewing full manuscripts. I’ll be querying this one more in the new year.

Window Pain: My first YA contemporary novel is in third draft mode. I’m currently going through the manuscript with my writer’s group. Once the fourth draft is complete, I’ll start querying this one as well, hopefully before summer hits.

Snodgaard and the Moustache of Power: I still love this humorous middle grade fantasy. I have a mid-sized publisher looking at this one right now with more querying to come.

The Typhon Project: I finished this YA sci-fi during the 3-Day Novel Contest. It’s more of a novella. I’ve considered rewriting to extend it to a full length novel, but that project is on the back burner right now.

Isadora’s Big Bleep: My first attempt at a picture book has been run by my writer’s group, and I’ve received some great advice on how to improve it. This project is  back-burnered as well.

Emerald (workinfull-moon-496873_1280g title): I finished this post-apocalyptic YA novel last summer. It’s probably one of the weirdest things I’ve ever written. It’ll remain in rough draft form until I can finish a couple other projects.

Three Moons: My active work-in-progress. I’m 12,000 words in on this YA urban fantasy.

Short Stories

The following is a list of short stories I’ve completed and still in need of a publication:

  • A Life as Twisted as Mine: retelling of a gruesome Bible story.
  • A Thirty Minute Head Start: the visitors will hunt her and use someone she cares about against her.
  • Bread for Five: a historical piece about loss on the frontier.
  • Bread and Butter: a young mother fights to keep her family together.
  • Confusion: A woman deals with sudden memory loss.
  • Flesh and Memory: a detective attempts to solve unusual murders amidst a developing illness.
  • Kicking the Habit: a quirky serial killer that can’t resist temptation.
  • Marriage Enrichment: when an attempt to improve their marriage goes terribly wrong.
  • The Will of Carlo Claeys: what she has to do to get her father’s money will bring out another side of her.
  • Water: all but four colonists have disappeared, have they brought the threat aboard the ship.

I have a lot of editing and querying ahead. Wish me luck!